Tuesday, April 29, 2008

More fascinating copywriting...

My new favourite copywriter seems to have a series of ads coming for Vakson real estate.

Following Saturday's ad which I posted, here's today's offering in EmBiz247:

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

This copywriter must be the same one who writes all the radio ads in that unique form of english. Latest one "till stocks last". The worst of it is it is read out by an actor who is quite obviously of UK extraction and must be inwardly cringeing at what he has to read out. Too spineless or lazy to correct it perhaps?

Seabee said...

Yes, I've also often wondered why the obviously English voice-overs don't point out the obvious mistakes. Maybe they also don't know there's something wrong...

Duffy said...

"Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought him back"

Rose in Dubai said...

Because you are required to read what is written. I will often do a grammatically correct version as well and as yet the correct one has never been used. Clients and egos I suspect.

Problem is these are usually not written by copywriters, they are written by clients who think they are clever and think they are saving money by writing it themsleves. Try to tell them they are making fools of themselves and wasting money and it just falls on deaf ears.

Seabee said...

Rose, it's always the client's fault, without exception, because the client has the last word.

Rose in Dubai said...

yes, it is the client's fault. But the bigger problem here is untrained account handlers who have no idea how to sell a good idea to a client. Most of them are not really account handlers, they're just order takers and they'd be more effective working at MacDonalds. Spineless and lazy just about sums it up.

Seabee said...

That's true Rose. I worked in agencies here from the early days (when we had no English media!) - it was the same then and it hasn't improved.

But that doesn't excuse bad or incorrect English, or any other language. That's down to poor language skills and, often, arrogance - "how dare you correct my English.

'til stocks last often appears on radio commercials for example - and you can bet that at least some of the copywriters are English!